An interpretation of the tyger a poem by william blake

Did he who made the Lamb make thee? Who could have made such a creation and moreover, who would perform such an act? In what distant deep or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? In the forests of the night; What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry? It must have been a god who played with fire who made the tiger.

Readers who have learnt some of the private symbols of Blake can only understand this poem. Burnt the fire of thine eyes?

As the poem leads on gradually, the poem clearly makes it a point to discuss God as an entity as opposed to the tyger. The tiger, whilst not a biblical animal, embodies the violent retribution and awesome might of Yahweh in the Old Testament.

The tiger is strikingly beautiful yet also horrific in its capacity for violence. In what furnace was thy brain? The use of the first stanza as a refrain repeating it with the difference of one word dare at the end is also for special emphasis on its symbolism.

On what wings dare he aspire? He slowly arrives at the question as how would a God be when he hath created such a scary creature walking freely in the jungle. The imaginative artist is synonymous with the creator. In the forests of the night What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry The initial verse refers to tyger, imploring about its beauty and creator.

The forest is the symbol of corrupted social conventions and that tries to suppress the good human potentials. And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand?

This stanza is purely Christian by all means. This individual will then begin his personal spiritual revolution.

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And what shoulder, and what art Could twist the sinews of thy heart? Comparing the creator to a blacksmith, he ponders about the anvil and the furnace that the project would have required and the smith who could have wielded them.

Did he who made the Lamb make thee? However, as the poem progresses, it takes on a symbolic character, and comes to embody the spiritual and moral problem the poem explores: Fearful symmetry is a nuanced trait which has dual allusions, one for the tyger and the other referring to divine deity.

And when the job was done, the speaker wonders, how would the creator have felt? In the forests of the night; What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

The Tyger by William Blake: Summary and Critical Analysis

What bolsters such an interpretation is the long-established associations between the lamb and Jesus Christ. The reference to the lamb in the penultimate stanza reminds the reader that a tiger and a lamb have been created by the same God, and raises questions about the implications of this.

Did he smile his work to see? The man with a revolutionary spirit can use such powers to fight against the evils of experience. What the hand, dare seize the fire? In what distant deeps or skies. What the hand, dare seize the fire?

What immortal hand or eye, Dare frame thy fearful symmetry? Tyger Tyger burning bright, In the forests of the night: It also continues from the first description of the tiger the imagery of fire with its simultaneous connotations of creation, purification, and destruction.

The tiger itself is a symbol for the fierce forces in the soul that are necessary to break the bonds of experience. What dead grasp Dare its deadly terrors clasp This stanza questions the steps involved in creation of the all-mighty jungle creature, the tyger.

It is created in the fire of imagination by the god who has a supreme imagination, spirituality and ideals.

The second stanza questions "the Tyger" about where he was created; the third about how the creator formed him; the fourth about what tools were used.

The poet adds to the fiery image of Tyger by using the metaphor of burning from first verse.A summary of “The Tyger” in William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Songs of Innocence and Experience and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. "The Tyger" is a poem taken from William Blake’s Songs of Experience.

The Tyger by William Blake

The poem is organized in the form of a series of rhetorical questions regarding the main character, the tiger, itself. The poet is equally amazed and intimidated by the presence of the creature, which he constantly compares to the domestic lamb.

‘The Tyger’ was first published in William Blake’s volume Songs of Experience, which contains many of his most celebrated poems. The Songs of Experience was designed to complement Blake’s earlier collection, Songs of Innocence (), and ‘The Tyger’ should be seen as the later volume’s answer to ‘The Lamb’, the ‘innocent’ poem.

The Tyger by William Blake: Summary and Critical Analysis The Tyger by William Blake is taken from The Songs of Experience. The tiger itself is a symbol for the fierce forces in the soul that are necessary to break the bonds of experience.

“The Tyger” by William Blake Analysis and Poem May 11, Gary R. Hess “The Tyger” by William Blake is often considered as one of the greatest poems ever written. The Tyger is not a simplistic poem as it yields many interpretations.

However, its strong, resonating rhyming drives the key concept in reader’s mind efficiently. William Blake’s literary masterpiece, ‘The Tyger’ has been scrutinized from literal and metaphorical point of views as he revisits his preferred dilemmas of innocence vs.

experience.

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An interpretation of the tyger a poem by william blake
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